The story forces its readers to reconsider an age-old question

The story forces its readers to reconsider an age-old question, and it sheds new light on what bravery and courage look like in the face of death and the acceptance of death. Everyone seems to know the end of the world is coming, and have chosen not to fight this. No one wants to age or die. The problem that we fail to see is the changelessness. Using the husband and wife as examples, the story shows that denial is an unproductive and unsatisfying way to handle problems. Even though she, too, has had the ominous dream about the end of the world, the woman feigns innocence when her husband asks her, “What would you do if you knew that this was the last night of the world?” At first, she asks her husband if he’s serious, and when he confirms that he is, she lies and says, “I don’t know. I hadn’t thought.” The woman is in denial that her dream is true, and she also denies that she’s given the end of the world any thought. This only stalls the conversation and keeps the couple from being able to talk openly about the end and what they mean to one another. In addition, because the husband doesn’t immediately tell his wife about his dream ,which he experiences three days before she does, the wife doesn’t realize the significance of her own dream when it happens. This means that her own suspicions go unconfirmed for several days, keeping her from actually grappling with the dream’s implications.
In addition, denial only increases fear and makes people feel isolated. Not wanting to believe her dream, and confirm its validity by bringing it up to her husband as a serious concern, the wife is forced to turn to the other women in the neighborhood instead of her own husband. Even then, the woman thinks “it was only a coincidence” that other woman on the block had the same dream. The woman is quick to deny the truth of the situation, which also keeps her from engaging deeply with the other women and talking about the implications of the dream.