The act of heroism is also explored in the novel A Farewell to Arms

The act of heroism is also explored in the novel A Farewell to Arms. To be a hero it takes more than to be like any other man, to reveal you to risks and hence, become more vulnerable to dangers of the probability of defeat or even death (Lewis, Robert W, p. 27). Hemingway said, “My favorite characters are men who deal with death and accept its risk.” To become such an honored man, one has to observe certain proposition that has no room for disgraceful actions. However, Henry in the novel shows to be an inverse of a hero due to his thoughts and actions. He is portrayed as a person who is indifferent and egocentric unprincipled actions harden his position as an anti-hero. The first indication of his anti-heroism is see-through his unethical approach to the war. When Henry is asked why he is participating in the army, he states that he “doesn’t know” because he does not “have an explanation for everything” (Hemingway, P.18). Henry lacks patriotism or principled reason for participating in the army and takes no dignity in fighting for his country. Henry’s attitude is easily differentiated from those who bravely demonstrate the extraordinary courage to present their country in the war field